Prof. DeeDee M. Bennett Gayle

University at Albany, United States

Invited Speech: Household Hazard Adjustments in Response to Climate Change

Biography:

Associate Professor, Emergency Management
Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security
College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity
University at Albany, State University of New York, United States
dmbennett@albany.edu

DeeDee M. Bennett Gayle, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany, State University of New York. Dr. Bennett Gayle broadly examines the influence and integration of advanced technologies on the practice of emergency management and for use by vulnerable populations. She is the director of the Social Vulnerability Lab within her college. With over 50 publications, her work is published in various journals, and she has presented at several conferences related to emergency management, disability, wireless technology, and future studies. She is co-editor of the edited book volume Social Vulnerability to COVID-19: Impacts of Technology Adoption and Information Behavior, currently in publication with Springer Nature Publishing. Dr. Bennett Gayle received her Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in Fire and Emergency Management. She has a unique academic background, having received both her M.S. in Public Policy and B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is an Advisory Board Member for the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM).

Abstract:

Climate projections anticipate that many people will be displaced due to the massive population centers situated along the coast, especially in the United States (U.S.). Migration, federal buyouts, home elevations, and evacuation (and other hazard adjustments) are all predicated on the decisions made at the household level. The climate projects do not always consider household characteristics and social vulnerabilities beyond assets to fully understand decision-making at the household level. Disparate impacts and outcomes are often related to hazard adjustments that lead to displacement. These hazard adjustments often contribute to more difficulty for socially vulnerable populations, namely racial and ethnic minorities. In this presentation, the impacts and strategies of minoritized households in the U.S. in response to climate change are reviewed. The key characteristics and vulnerabilities related to decision-making at the household level are highlighted in preparation for a more extensive qualitative study to understand why and how households make hazard adjustments in response to climate change.

Abstract

Prof. DeeDee M. Bennett Gayle

Climate projections anticipate that many people will be displaced due to the massive population centers situated along the coast, especially in the United States (U.S.). Migration, federal buyouts, home elevations, and evacuation (and other hazard adjustments) are all predicated on the decisions made at the household level. The climate projects do not always consider household characteristics and social vulnerabilities beyond assets to fully understand decision-making at the household level. Disparate impacts and outcomes are often related to hazard adjustments that lead to displacement. These hazard adjustments often contribute to more difficulty for socially vulnerable populations, namely racial and ethnic minorities. In this presentation, the impacts and strategies of minoritized households in the U.S. in response to climate change are reviewed. The key characteristics and vulnerabilities related to decision-making at the household level are highlighted in preparation for a more extensive qualitative study to understand why and how households make hazard adjustments in response to climate change.