Prof. Clara Chow

University of Sydney, Australia

Keynote Speech: Neglected Hypertension: How does the Environment Positively and/or Negatively Affect your Hypertension?

Biography:

Professor of Medicine, Academic Director Westmead Applied Research Centre, University of Sydney, Australia

Professor Clara Chow is Academic Director of the Westmead Applied Research Centre (WARC), Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney. She is a cardiologist and the Program Director of Community Based Cardiac Services at Westmead hospital and is also a member of the Western Sydney Local Health District (WSLHD) Governing Board, Sydney, Australia. Professor Chow has also been appointed the Director of the Australian Stroke and Heart Accelerator (ASHRA). She currently holds honorary appointments as the Charles Perkins Centre Westmead Academic Co-director and President of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Professor Chow’s research focuses on the prevention of cardiovascular disease, innovation in the delivery of cardiovascular care and the evaluation of digital health interventions. She has expertise in the design, delivery and implementation of clinical trials. Her PhD from the University of Sydney, Australia was in cardiovascular epidemiology and international public Health and her Postdoc from McMaster University, Canada in clinical trials and cardiac imaging. She is supported by a NHMRC Investigator grant.

Abstract:

Despite the World Health Organisation amongst others recognising that hypertension is a leading modifiable cause of global morbidity and mortality, the global prevalence of hypertension, at about 40%, has been stagnant for the last 20 years, with prevalence dropping in some high-income countries but remaining the same or increased in many low- and middle- income countries. The reasons for this are multi-factorial with barriers at the individual, health care, and larger system and environment levels. Some of these barriers are surprisingly consistent globally, for example treatment inertia. Yet there are other barriers such as availability and affordability of medicines that are variable. The solutions are also not straight forward. There has been some innovation in interventions and ideas that could address the burden of hypertension globally. These include better use of fixed dose combination therapy as well as system level interventions, some that involve different ways of engaging the health and non-health work force in management of blood pressure, others involving digital solutions. The use of fixed dose combination greatly improves the likelihood that blood pressure will be controlled, with evidence from clinical trials supporting this, and international clinical guidelines also recommending combination therapy as first line for control of hypertension. However, the implementation of this evidence has not been anywhere near universal. This talk will discuss hypertension globally, where we are now, how we have got here, and what we could do to reduce the burden of hypertension globally.

Abstract

Prof. Clara Chow

Despite the World Health Organisation amongst others recognising that hypertension is a leading modifiable cause of global morbidity and mortality, the global prevalence of hypertension, at about 40%, has been stagnant for the last 20 years, with prevalence dropping in some high-income countries but remaining the same or increased in many low- and middle- income countries. The reasons for this are multi-factorial with barriers at the individual, health care, and larger system and environment levels. Some of these barriers are surprisingly consistent globally, for example treatment inertia. Yet there are other barriers such as availability and affordability of medicines that are variable. The solutions are also not straight forward. There has been some innovation in interventions and ideas that could address the burden of hypertension globally. These include better use of fixed dose combination therapy as well as system level interventions, some that involve different ways of engaging the health and non-health work force in management of blood pressure, others involving digital solutions. The use of fixed dose combination greatly improves the likelihood that blood pressure will be controlled, with evidence from clinical trials supporting this, and international clinical guidelines also recommending combination therapy as first line for control of hypertension. However, the implementation of this evidence has not been anywhere near universal. This talk will discuss hypertension globally, where we are now, how we have got here, and what we could do to reduce the burden of hypertension globally.