Prof. Andy Jones

Norfolk County Council & University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

Keynote Speech: Environmental Influences on Population Health - Measuring the impact of poverty on human health in natural rural environments

Biography:

Expert Advisor in Public Health, Norfolk County Council
Honorary Professorial Fellow of Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

Prof. Andy Jones works as an Expert Advisor in Public Health at Norfolk County Council and a Honorary Professorial Fellow of Norwich Medical School at University of East Anglia. He has wide ranging expertise in public health, including the pragmatic evaluation of public health interventions, the role of the environment as a determinant of health and related behaviours, and the impact of access to services on health outcomes. He has keen interests in policy and delivery and has worked closely with a range of key organisations including the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and Cancer Research UK. He heads a prolific research group, has won £25 million of research funding as lead or co-applicant, and has published over 270 peer-reviewed journal articles. He has an impact (h) index score of 61, which is classified as “exceptional” and places me in the top percentile of academics worldwide.

Abstract:

Whilst it is generally accepted that living in more natural environment may bring a range of health benefits associated with contact with nature, the residents of rural areas face several potential challenges not encountered by their urban counterparts including social isolation, a lack of skilled employment opportunities and greater distances to travel to health services. All of these might adversely impact their health, raising the need to understand how the health benefits of living close to nature are balanced against opportunity deprivation for those outside urban areas. Deprivation indices have been widely used to understand geographical variations in poverty in healthcare research and planning in many countries since the mid-1980s. However, urban areas tend to dominate the deprived end of these indices because of the methods that are typically used to generate them, meaning it can be difficult to understand the impact of rural poverty on health. This research examines issues around the measurement of multiple deprivation in rural areas and, using a case study approach of a rural setting in part of the UK, it provides a series of recommendations about how this might be better done.

Abstract

Prof. Andy Jones

Whilst it is generally accepted that living in more natural environment may bring a range of health benefits associated with contact with nature, the residents of rural areas face several potential challenges not encountered by their urban counterparts including social isolation, a lack of skilled employment opportunities and greater distances to travel to health services. All of these might adversely impact their health, raising the need to understand how the health benefits of living close to nature are balanced against opportunity deprivation for those outside urban areas. Deprivation indices have been widely used to understand geographical variations in poverty in healthcare research and planning in many countries since the mid-1980s. However, urban areas tend to dominate the deprived end of these indices because of the methods that are typically used to generate them, meaning it can be difficult to understand the impact of rural poverty on health. This research examines issues around the measurement of multiple deprivation in rural areas and, using a case study approach of a rural setting in part of the UK, it provides a series of recommendations about how this might be better done.