Ms. Pham Thi Thu Huong

National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Invited Speech: The Correlation between Psychiatric Morbidity and COVID-19 Stressors: A Nationwide Community Survey in Taiwan

Biography:

School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Ms Pham Thi Thu Huong is lecturer in Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Hanoi Medical University and National Institute of Mental Health, Bach Mai hospital, Vietnam. Currently, she is completing Ph.D degree at the School of Nursing College of Medicine, National Taiwan University.
Her research focuses on understanding patients with treatment-resistant depression, suicide assessment/prevention, sexual health care, mental health and COVID-19, caregiver burden. She is passionate about developing nurse-led intervention for patients with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal individuals, promote mental health in low-and middle-income countries, mainly in Vietnam. Her latest publications include “The influence of research follow-up during COVID-19 pandemic on mental distress and resilience: a multicenter cohort study in treatment-resistant depression” (International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2022); “Association of suicide risk and community integration among patients with treatment-resistant depression” (Frontiers in Psychiatry, 2022); “The impact of COVID-19 stressors on Psychological distress and suicidality in a Nationwide Community Survey in Taiwan” (Scientific Report, 2022).

Abstract:

Study Objectives: COVID-19 stressors and psychological stress response are important correlates of suicide risks under the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between psychiatric morbidity and COVID-19 stressors among the general population during the outbreak of COVID-19 in July 2020 throughout Taiwan.

Methods: A nationwide population-based survey was conducted using a computer-assisted telephone interview system with a stratified, proportional randomization method for the survey. The questionnaire comprised demographic variables, psychological distress assessed by the five-item Brief Symptom Rating Scale and independent psychosocial variables including COVID-19 stressors, and health-related self-efficacy.

Results: In total, 2094 respondents completed the survey (female 51%). The COVID-19 stress was experienced among 45.4% of the participants, with the most prevalent stressors related to daily life and job/financial concerns. Five domains of COVID-19 stressors and health-related self-efficacy were significant risk factors linked to psychiatric morbidity. Further, the more COVID-19 stressors the participants experienced, the higher score of psychological distress they suffered in the past month.

Conclusions: The findings call for more attention on strategies of stress management and mental health promotion for the public to prevent larger scales of psychological consequences in future waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Ms. Pham Thi Thu Huong

Study Objectives: COVID-19 stressors and psychological stress response are important correlates of suicide risks under the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between psychiatric morbidity and COVID-19 stressors among the general population during the outbreak of COVID-19 in July 2020 throughout Taiwan.

Methods: A nationwide population-based survey was conducted using a computer-assisted telephone interview system with a stratified, proportional randomization method for the survey. The questionnaire comprised demographic variables, psychological distress assessed by the five-item Brief Symptom Rating Scale and independent psychosocial variables including COVID-19 stressors, and health-related self-efficacy.

Results: In total, 2094 respondents completed the survey (female 51%). The COVID-19 stress was experienced among 45.4% of the participants, with the most prevalent stressors related to daily life and job/financial concerns. Five domains of COVID-19 stressors and health-related self-efficacy were significant risk factors linked to psychiatric morbidity. Further, the more COVID-19 stressors the participants experienced, the higher score of psychological distress they suffered in the past month.

Conclusions: The findings call for more attention on strategies of stress management and mental health promotion for the public to prevent larger scales of psychological consequences in future waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.