Ms. Angelia Sia

National Parks Board, Singapore

Invited Speech: People-Nature Interactions and Wellbeing - A Case Study in a Tropical City

National Parks Board, Singapore

Biography:

Ms. Angelia Sia is Deputy Director with the National Parks Board, Singapore. She is currently a PhD candidate with the Department of Psychological Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Her research investigates the well-being benefits associated with the interactions between people and nature in cities. Angelia received her first degree from the NUS and Master of Business Administration from Imperial College London. Apart from research, she has interest in writing and is the chief editor of the award-winning magazine CITYGREEN.

Abstract:

It is widely acknowledged that ‘time in nature’ brings a range of benefits to city-dwellers, from increasing physical activity level to improving mental health. Supported by theoretical frameworks, notably the Stress Reduction Theory and Attention Restoration Theory, it is understood that natural environments, with the presence of elements like vegetation and water, have an advantage over built ones, in providing ‘relief from stress’ and ‘soft fascination’ that restores individuals from attentional fatigue. Singapore, a city state with high population density, has a longstanding focus on making provision for urban parks and greenery in tandem with urban development. In particular, the National Parks Board recognizes the role of greenery in enhancing the well-being of people. This presentation shares evidence-based insights on the benefits of various nature-based interventions introduced in Singapore.

Abstract

Ms. Angelia Sia

It is widely acknowledged that ‘time in nature’ brings a range of benefits to city-dwellers, from increasing physical activity level to improving mental health. Supported by theoretical frameworks, notably the Stress Reduction Theory and Attention Restoration Theory, it is understood that natural environments, with the presence of elements like vegetation and water, have an advantage over built ones, in providing ‘relief from stress’ and ‘soft fascination’ that restores individuals from attentional fatigue. Singapore, a city state with high population density, has a longstanding focus on making provision for urban parks and greenery in tandem with urban development. In particular, the National Parks Board recognizes the role of greenery in enhancing the well-being of people. This presentation shares evidence-based insights on the benefits of various nature-based interventions introduced in Singapore.