Dr. Xiaoqi Feng

University of New South Wales, Australia

Featured Speech: Greener Cities, Healthier Futures

Biography:

Associate Professor in Urban Health and Environment, School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Australia

Xiaoqi Feng is the Associate Professor in Urban Health and Environment in the UNSW School of Population Health, Australia. Xiao leads a program of research focused on enhancing population wellbeing through identifying modifiable environmental factors (e.g. green space) that shape health across the lifecourse. She has authored >160 publications, led major research projects (funding >$19.4M, including NHMRC), and translated her research into policy.

Xiao has won multiple research awards and her research has informed councils urban greening strategies (e.g. City of Sydney) She’s empowering young and diverse communities of scientists as the founding co-director of PowerLab (www.PowerLab.site). Internationally, Xiao is an elected council member and education committee chair for the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology Asia-Western Pacific Chapter.

Abstract:

There appears to be increasing appreciation for the health benefits of nature and, simultaneously, a widespread movement to reforest cities around the world. This will hopefully lead to sustained health improvements for all, but there are some indications in the literature that this might not always be the case. In this presentation, I will outline evidence for the domains of pathways linking nature and health, highlighting matters of contingency and evidence that shows how some groups are able to reap the benefits more than others. In doing so, I will discuss opportunities for shifting future research emphasis from understanding the impacts of green space on health per se, to measuring the net-impacts of urban greening processes on health (in)equity.

Abstract

Dr. Xiaoqi Feng

There appears to be increasing appreciation for the health benefits of nature and, simultaneously, a widespread movement to reforest cities around the world. This will hopefully lead to sustained health improvements for all, but there are some indications in the literature that this might not always be the case. In this presentation, I will outline evidence for the domains of pathways linking nature and health, highlighting matters of contingency and evidence that shows how some groups are able to reap the benefits more than others. In doing so, I will discuss opportunities for shifting future research emphasis from understanding the impacts of green space on health per se, to measuring the net-impacts of urban greening processes on health (in)equity.