Dr. Le Duc Huy

Hue University, Vietnam

Invited Speech: Global Impacts of Nutrition Deficiency and Diet Risks on COVID-19 Resilience Index During the Emergence of COVID-19 Variants: A Global Burden of Diseases Analysis

Biography:

Health Personnel Training Institute, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy - Hue University, Vietnam

Dr. Huy is a medical doctor in preventive medicine, a lecturer, and a researcher at Health Personnel Training Institute, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vietnam. He completed the fellowship program given by the International Society for Quality in Health Care in 2021. Currently, he is pursuing the M.B.A Degree in the Master Program of Health Care Administration, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. In addition, Dr.Huy actively participated in and reported at various international conferences regarding public health, patient safety, and health policy. His research focuses on health literacy, bibliometric study, health policy, adolescent health, and the application of artificial intelligence in health care management.

Abstract:

Background: There is little knowledge about nutrition deficiency and diet risk on COVID-19 resilience. The study explores the factors influencing the pandemic resilience index and the characteristics of countries with good performance during the Delta and Omicron variant dominance periods.

Methods: Our study included COVID-19 data from 29 countries over the first eight weeks during two periods dominated by Delta and Omicron variants. The resilience index was calculated by three indicators mortality, hospitalization rate, and ICU admission rate. Data were retrieved from different open databases (Our World in Data, Global Burden Disease data, World Bank).

Results: After controlling for vaccination rate and public health measures, no factors related to nutrition deficiency have a significant association with the COVID-19 resilience index in each variant period. Higher body mass index was strongly associated with poorer resilience index during the omicron period. However, over two periods, the countries with good performance in pandemic control have significantly lower years lost by disability caused by vitamin A deficiency, Iron deficiency, and diet risks compared with the poor performance group.

Conclusion: Country-level burden of nutrition deficiency and diet risks were significantly lower in countries with good performance of pandemic control over two periods. High body mass index was a significant factor associated with a poorer resilience index. Therefore, the government response plan for nutrition deficiency and diet risks should be paid more attention to and require further evaluation to reduce the COVID-19 burden driven by nutrition causes.

Abstract

Dr. Le Duc Huy

Background: There is little knowledge about nutrition deficiency and diet risk on COVID-19 resilience. The study explores the factors influencing the pandemic resilience index and the characteristics of countries with good performance during the Delta and Omicron variant dominance periods.

Methods: Our study included COVID-19 data from 29 countries over the first eight weeks during two periods dominated by Delta and Omicron variants. The resilience index was calculated by three indicators mortality, hospitalization rate, and ICU admission rate. Data were retrieved from different open databases (Our World in Data, Global Burden Disease data, World Bank).

Results: After controlling for vaccination rate and public health measures, no factors related to nutrition deficiency have a significant association with the COVID-19 resilience index in each variant period. Higher body mass index was strongly associated with poorer resilience index during the omicron period. However, over two periods, the countries with good performance in pandemic control have significantly lower years lost by disability caused by vitamin A deficiency, Iron deficiency, and diet risks compared with the poor performance group.

Conclusion: Country-level burden of nutrition deficiency and diet risks were significantly lower in countries with good performance of pandemic control over two periods. High body mass index was a significant factor associated with a poorer resilience index. Therefore, the government response plan for nutrition deficiency and diet risks should be paid more attention to and require further evaluation to reduce the COVID-19 burden driven by nutrition causes.