Dr. Ian Ryan

University at Albany, United States

Invited Speech: Ultrafine Particles and Hospital Visits for Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases in New York State, 2013-2018

Biography:

University at Albany, State University of New York, United States

Dr. Ryan received two master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, one in Public Health and the other in Public Affairs. He then earned his PhD in environmental health sciences from the State University of New York at Albany. In the last three years, Dr. Ryan has published several papers related to the human health impacts of air pollution, extreme heat, disasters, and other environmental exposures. He has also presented on the specific topic of Ultrafine Particles at multiple international conferences.

Abstract:

Introduction: Ultrafine particles are a unique public health challenge due to their size. However, limited studies have examined their impacts on human health, especially across seasons and demographics. This study evaluated the effect of ultrafine particle exposure on chronic lower respiratory diseases in New York State, 2013-2018. Methods: We estimated how ultrafine particle exposure led to chronic lower respiratory disease-related emergency department visits using a case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression. GEOS-Chem-APM, a state-of-the-art chemical transport model with a size-resolved particle microphysics model, generated air pollution simulation data. We then matched ultrafine particle exposure estimates to geocoded health records for asthma, bronchiectasis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, unspecified bronchitis, and other chronic airway obstructions. In addition, we assessed interactions with age, ethnicity, race, sex, meteorological factors, and season. Results: Each interquartile range increase in ultrafine particle exposure led to a 0.4% increased risk of a respiratory-related emergency department visit on lag 0-0 (95% CI: 0.2-0.5%) and peaked at 1.8% on lag 0-6 (95% CI: 1.6-2.0%). The highest risk was in the subtype emphysema (lag 0-5: 4.2%, 95% CI: 0.2-8.4%), followed by asthma, chronic bronchitis, other chronic airway obstructions, and unspecified bronchitis (lag 0-6, excess risk range: 1.5-2.0%). We also found significant interactions with seasons (especially fall), mild thermal conditions (temperature/RH <=90th percentile), for children (<18), and among males (lag 0-6, excess risk range: 1.0-2.8%). Conclusion: In this study, UFP exposure increased CLRD-related ED visits across all seasons and demographics, yet these associations varied according to a host of factors, which requires more research

Abstract

Dr. Ian Ryan

Introduction: Ultrafine particles are a unique public health challenge due to their size. However, limited studies have examined their impacts on human health, especially across seasons and demographics. This study evaluated the effect of ultrafine particle exposure on chronic lower respiratory diseases in New York State, 2013-2018. Methods: We estimated how ultrafine particle exposure led to chronic lower respiratory disease-related emergency department visits using a case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression. GEOS-Chem-APM, a state-of-the-art chemical transport model with a size-resolved particle microphysics model, generated air pollution simulation data. We then matched ultrafine particle exposure estimates to geocoded health records for asthma, bronchiectasis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, unspecified bronchitis, and other chronic airway obstructions. In addition, we assessed interactions with age, ethnicity, race, sex, meteorological factors, and season. Results: Each interquartile range increase in ultrafine particle exposure led to a 0.4% increased risk of a respiratory-related emergency department visit on lag 0-0 (95% CI: 0.2-0.5%) and peaked at 1.8% on lag 0-6 (95% CI: 1.6-2.0%). The highest risk was in the subtype emphysema (lag 0-5: 4.2%, 95% CI: 0.2-8.4%), followed by asthma, chronic bronchitis, other chronic airway obstructions, and unspecified bronchitis (lag 0-6, excess risk range: 1.5-2.0%). We also found significant interactions with seasons (especially fall), mild thermal conditions (temperature/RH <=90th percentile), for children (<18), and among males (lag 0-6, excess risk range: 1.0-2.8%). Conclusion: In this study, UFP exposure increased CLRD-related ED visits across all seasons and demographics, yet these associations varied according to a host of factors, which requires more research.