Dr. Carmel Bouclaous

Lebanese American University, Lebanon

Invited Speech: Numeracy Skills in Lebanese Adults with Diabetes

Biography:

Assistant Professor, Gilbert and Rose-Marie
Chagoury School of Medicine, Lebanese American University (LAU), Lebanon

Dr. Carmel Bouclaous is Assistant Professor affiliated to the Gilbert and Rose-Marie Chagoury School of Medicine, Lebanese American University (LAU), Lebanon. She teaches social medicine, global health, and nutrition. Her research focuses on the effects of the social, political and economic environments on health and health disparities among host and refugee populations. She is member of a WHO expert panel on health literacy and member of the research committee of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. Dr Bouclaous serves as Advisor to the Lebanese Medical Students’ International Committee (LeMSIC)-LAU section and the LAU Medical Students’ Association (MSA).

Abstract:

Introduction: This study assessed numeracy skills in Lebanese adults with diabetes as a proxy for diabetes control since numeracy skills are required in the interpretation of blood glucose meter data and food labels, insulin pump dosage, and determination of dietary carbohydrate intake. Methods: The questionnaire included the Diabetes Numeracy Test-15 (DNT-15) and items on sociodemographic and health-related factors. It was completed by 299 adults with diabetes, mean age 47.4±19.8 years. Results: Numeracy skills were higher in males, single individuals, in type 1 diabetes, controlled HbA1c, with income and higher educational level, and prior visit to a dietician. Conclusion: Interventions are needed to improve the numeracy skills of individuals with diabetes in order to prevent health complications and promote appropriate self-management behaviors.

Abstract

Dr. Carmel Bouclaous

Introduction: This study assessed numeracy skills in Lebanese adults with diabetes as a proxy for diabetes control since numeracy skills are required in the interpretation of blood glucose meter data and food labels, insulin pump dosage, and determination of dietary carbohydrate intake. Methods: The questionnaire included the Diabetes Numeracy Test-15 (DNT-15) and items on sociodemographic and health-related factors. It was completed by 299 adults with diabetes, mean age 47.4±19.8 years. Results: Numeracy skills were higher in males, single individuals, in type 1 diabetes, controlled HbA1c, with income and higher educational level, and prior visit to a dietician. Conclusion: Interventions are needed to improve the numeracy skills of individuals with diabetes in order to prevent health complications and promote appropriate self-management behaviors.